10 Outdoor Patio sets under $500

Summer, summer, summertimeeeeee (insert annoying karaoke voice).  Summer is almost here, and it’s that time of year where we all hustle to get our outdoor spaces in order.  And with COVID-19, I’ve been dying to make our outdoor space more enjoyable to sit in.  However, I know for some, money is pretty tight right now.  So if you’re starting from scratch, and don’t want to break the bank, I’ve rounded up 10 patio sets all under $500.

**This post contains affiliate links.  That means if you purchase something through my link, while it’s the same cost to you, I get a small commission that helps me and my family.

1. Emma 5 Piece Rattan Seating Group with Cushions ($249)

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This is $249, and you can find it here.

2. Glynn 4 Piece Sofa Seating Group with Cushions ($369)

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This is $369.99, and you can find it here.

3. Lattin 3 Piece Rattan Seating Group with Cushions ($252.99)

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Wanted to provide a close-up of this because it’s GORGEOUS.  Here’s the full set:

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This is $252.99 and you can find it here.

4. Delray 4 Piece Sofa Seating Group with Cushions ($459)

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This is $459 and you can find it here.

5. Daytona 4 Piece Sofa Seating Group with Cushions ($459)

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This is $459, and you can find it here.

6. Eldora 2 Piece Seating Group with Cushions ($479)

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This is $479, and you can find it here.

7. Claytor 3 Piece Rattan Conversation Set ($349)

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This is $349, and you can find it here.

8. Ozark 4pc Patio Seating Set – Safavieh ($370)

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This is $370, and you can find it here.

9. Carsten 4pc Patio Conversation Set – Black – Project 62™ ($384)

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This is $384, and you can find it here.

10.  Perla Outdoor Acacia Wood Club Chair with Cushion (Set of 2) by Christopher Knight Home ($350)

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This is $350, and you can find it here.

Stay tuned for a few follow-up posts on rugs, accessories, and other furniture favorites that aren’t “sets.” And if you found this useful, please sign up for my email updates below.  I promise I won’t spam you.  We can be best buds.

Love,

Deema

DIY Faux Wallpaper Using A Pencil!

I’ve been dying to add some texture to the wall behind my bed, but wanted it to be subtle.  I didn’t want to paint it, and I had already tried a sponge technique on the other side of the room.  I found this wallpaper at Anthropologie that I really liked, and I thought, why not draw it?

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So I grabbed a pencil, a level, turned on some Etta James, and got to work.

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I had this 48-inch level and this 12 inch level left over from when I did my DIY sharpie subway tile and used them.  I honestly don’t know how I decided, but I landed on doing 12″ x 18″ rectangles.  I simply grabbed a pencil and started drawing.

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I can tell you, I made way more mistakes in the beginning, and then when I got the hang of it, I used the eraser WAY less.  This is what I did for ONE rectangle:

  1. Draw an 18″ vertical line
  2. Added another right next to it (see pic, I didn’t use measurements I eyeballed and it’s not perfect)
  3. Created a space of about an inch
  4. Draw another two 18″ vertical lines
  5. Draw a 12″ horizontal line
  6. Added another right next to it (see pic, I didn’t use measurements I eyeballed and it’s not perfect)
  7. Created a space of about an inch
  8. Draw another two 12″ horizontal lines

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What made each of the “stripes” beautiful, are the details of the two thinner lines on each side–don’t skip out on those!

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I then erased in a circular motion in the middle to get that washed out look–like the Anthropologie wallpaper had.  You can see there are tons of imperfections, so don’t beat yourself up over them–at least I don’t.  Because overall, when you look at the entire wall, it will look great…

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You can see a closer look on video here–just scroll through my “highlight” to get to the part where I do this DIY.

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I like the subtle look, but you can always darken the lines with a paint pen if you prefer–and probably better if you are in a high traffic area.  I’m not so concerned with the pencil lines because it’s behind my bed where no one walks by it or touches it.  If you want to try this somewhere that you’re worried about smudges, maybe try a paint pen.  However, for my space, I was going for subtle.

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As always, please DM me on Instagram if you try this or have questions!  And please, sign up for my email updates below.  I promise I won’t spam you.  We can be best buds.

Love,

Deema

 

 

 

 

 

 

DIY Faux Subway Tile Using A Sharpie In Two Easy Steps!

After I did my DIY Faux backsplash using a sponge for my master bath, I kept thinking about what other ways I could do a faux backsplash in the kids bathroom. I had already used the sponge technique a few times, and I wanted to try something a little different. I had seen so many DIYers use Sharpie on walls for so many neat patterns and I thought why not try a faux subway tile with Sharpie?  And so I did.

Here’s what you’ll need:

First let me show you what the space looked like before..

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And here’s the other side..

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For my bathroom, I decided to do “tiles” that were 4″x6″ in size–however, you choose what works best for your space.

First step:

I used the level to draw all the horizontal lines in pencil, and then the same with the vertical lines.  The level is a HUGE life saver.

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Second step:

Trace the lines with Sharpie!  And that’s it.  Just make sure you have music on hand, and maybe a drink, just to keep you sane.

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And once I was done, here’s what it looked like!  FULL VIDEO TUTORIAL HERE.

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And the other side of the bathroom..

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And back around…..The corners were a bit tough, make sure you still sharpie right on the corner!

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It was VERY easy, but incredibly tedious.  If you are a beginner at DIYs, this is totally doable.  That ruler level is a complete lifesaver, and makes this super easy.  Lastly, I learned after I did this DIY, that some DIYers use Sharpie paint pen (instead of the Sharpie markers I used).  I don’t know the difference, but I’ve heard the others may be easier to paint over.  I simply linked what I used for this specific DIY–do your research if you’re concerned about removing it down the road!

As always, please DM me on Instagram if you try this or have questions!  And again, the full video tutorial is here. And please, sign up for my email updates below.  I promise I won’t spam you.  We can be best buds.

Love,

Deema

 

How To Turn A Dresser Into A Beautiful Built In

One of my most recent projects was the kid’s room, and I couldn’t be happier with how it turned out.  It all started with an old dresser I was thinking of selling but then had a vision, then had tunnel vision, and then there was no turning back.  It took some time, but was easier than I thought.  And while this may not be the best way to do it, it was the easiest and cheapest option I could find.  When I wanted to do this, I had no idea how, and I thought I’d share the steps I took for those of you looking to do something similar.

First, let me show you the space.  This is my kids room the day we moved in below.

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And this is the dresser that was literally an inch too wide to fit in between the closets.  **Que a huge buzz kill**

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First thing I did, was have someone come and saw off the sides. And it was in!

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Next I wanted to remove all the “feet” on the bottom of the dresser for a more cohesive look so that it was flat on the ground, and also because the dresser was too high for the window.  Luckily that part was easy because they screwed right off.  The other issue was, there was a gap in between the dresser and the window–so I went to home depot, bought a piece of plywood, and we nailed it on the top and you can see below.

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The next thing was, I HATED how there was a gap in between the dresser and the closet.  There were a few options here, but we ended up getting insulating foam sealant and pre-mixed joint compound to fill the gaps.  I will say it took two separate days because it would shrink after drying.

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And there it is, filled up.  It then took some very careful sanding to smooth it out.  I will say, it’s not perfect by any stretch, but I was happy with the outcome and couldn’t wait to paint and swap out the hardware!

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I was so excited when the Rejuvenation hardware came in, I tried it on even before I painted.  Just look at the difference in the closet handles!  This is actually a drawer pull–it’s the 12-inch Elroy Drawer Pull and it was worth every penny.

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And for the dresser, I bought the Dish Cabinet Knob with round plate.  The work on all the Rejuvenation hardware is absolutely beautiful.  I then painted everything using Greige Trim Paint from Clare Paint and I was done!

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I am so in love!

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I could not be happier, and this completely transformed the room.  And if you’d like to know how I color blocked this wall, check out my easy DIY here.  Let me know if you’ve done something similar, or plan to do something similar–I’d love to see!  And please, sign up for my email updates below.  I promise I won’t spam you.  We can be best buds.

Love,

Deema

A Simple (and free) DIY To Create Some Seriously Cute Kid’s Art

We’ve all been stuck at home during this quarantine and while I can still online shop, there is nothing like a good trip to the thrift store.  If I had to pick the one thing I miss most about thrift stores, it would hands down be the art.  And while I can’t leave the house, I decided to get creative.

If you’ve been following me on Instagram, you know that I’ve had the kids draw/paint pictures that I framed and hung up in their bedroom.

img_4816Well, yesterday I did an impulse DIY and I LOVEEEEE how it turned out–I decided to take some old kid’s books, tear out some of the pages, and frame them.  Below are the deets:

Step 1:  Grab all the old frames I had in the house and put them in a pile so that I could see what sizes I was working with.

Step 2: Grab all the books that you feel comfortable murdering and put them in a pile so you can see all the different sizes–in all seriousness, we have tons of duplicate books from bday parties and gifts.

Step 3: Make two piles–A pile for the books that have art that speaks to you, and a pile for the books that don’t.

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Step 4: Go through the pile you love and start to pick out what pictures you want in what frames–and trim the pages when applicable.

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I also opted to keep the glass out of the frame because I really hate when there’s a glare.  See below?  No bueno.

img_5311Because I was doing a gallery wall, I decided to spray paint some of the frames so I could have a good mix of metals.

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I wish you could see it in person, the wall is coming to life!  Who knew that children’s books would make such beautiful art.img_5356

My kids absolutely love it too!

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Here’s the link to my highlights where you can see a close up of all the pieces and a video of the wall. 

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As always, please DM me on Instagram if you try it.  I would LOVE to see.  And please, sign up for my email updates below.  I promise I won’t spam you.  We can be best buds.

Love,

Deema

 

 

 

 

 

 

How To Color Block A Wall In 4 Easy Steps

About a month ago I started to finish up the kid’s room, and felt like something was missing.  The walls felt unfinished, and they needed a “layer” of something.  This was also the only one of two rooms in the house without any wainscoting and it always bothered me.  And while I know I could’ve added some, I wanted a quicker, cheaper, and easier way to accomplish a similar look.  I had seen several color block walls on Pinterest, and I figured it was time to give it a try.

For context, this was the wall– Something just felt like it was missing, minus the fact that I hadn’t completely removed the decals that covered the entire wall yet (upper right).

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After removing the rest of the decals, this was the bare wall.

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For starters, there is no way I could’ve gotten a straight line without my laser level linked here.  I chose this because it was cheap and had great reviews on amazon–I will say that one thing I did NOT like about this level, was that the height can’t be adjusted.  I literally had to stack it on top of a bunch of books to get it where I needed it–but it got the job done, and it was cheap.

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This is what it looks like, it’s pretty small, and you can place it anywhere–another option (if you don’t want to use books), is to buy a stand for it.

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This is what the lazer looks like when it’s on, it’s pretty faint and isn’t as dark when you have a ton of sunlight coming in.  I know some DIYers advise using painters tape to line up here, but I found it easier and simpler to grab a super thin paint brush and simply tracing the line.

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Once I did that, I took a slightly thicker paint brush just to paint a thicker edge–that way when I used the paint roller I didn’t have to worry about accidentally painting over it.  You can use any paint brushes, but I used this pack on Amazon–I used the smallest one to trace, and the largest brush to fill a wider space.

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And now you can turn the lazer light off and grab your paint roller–as you can see the only place I used painter’s tape was on the baseboard.  I typically use 4-6 inch rollers, and for this wall I used a 6 inch.  I did two coats of Greige from Clare Paint, and I was done.

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Once I saw the one wall, I knew I had to complete the entire room.

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I was in love.  This was so easy and did not take much time at all.

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I ended up wrapping it all the way around the other side of the room too.  It completely transformed the room, and flowed right into those built ins I worked on prior.  And again, it was so easy!

Just to recap:

Step 1: Use a laser level to mark where you want to start the color.

Step 2: Use a thin paint brush to paint a thin line right on the lazer line.

Step 3: Take a slightly larger paint brush to fill out the line–that way when you use the roller, you don’t have to worry about accidentally going over the line.

Step 4: Use a roller brush to apply as many coats as you need–I did two coats.

And that’s it!

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And just for reference, I painted mine at 4 feet (my baseboards are 4 inches).  And again, I used Greige by Clare Paint.  Hope you like it, I know I do!  And the best part?  Super easy, quick, and cheap!  As always, please DM me on Instagram if you try it.  I would LOVE to see!  If you’re interested in other ways I’ve used different paint techniques in other rooms of my house, check out my past blog posts below:

  1. Faux DIY Backsplash Using Paint And A Dish Sponge
  2. DIY Sponge Paint Wall–Small Budget, Huge Impact
  3. DIY Faux Wallpaper Ideas

And please, sign up for my email updates below.  I promise I won’t spam you.  We can be best buds.

Love,

Deema

 

Faux DIY Backsplash Using Paint And A Dish Sponge

I wanted to share a fun, cheap, and easy DIY I did this weekend that made such a dramatic transformation to my master bathroom.  The real star of the show was the faux backsplash I did with a sponge, however, let me walk you through the entire bathroom refresh…

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This is my master bathroom, it’s not awful, in fact, the previous owner had remodeled it.  However, I always felt like the paint was “blah” and so was the entire bathroom.  I really wanted to add some life to it.

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Because we’re all stuck at home during this quarantine, I used what I had in the house.  I grabbed some leftover Greige Clare Paint that I had used in the kids room, and painted all the cabinets.  I then took this dull silver hardware, and spray painted it black. (excuse the awful pics!)

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Now for the fun part…I’ve always wanted a backsplash in here, but installing tile or stone is not on my list of current talents—I can imagine many of you are in the same boat.  So what did I do?  I grabbed a sponge, some leftover Seize The Gray Clare Paint, and I got to work.

Here’s what the sponge looked like (pretty much your standard dish sponge):

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You can see the full video tutorial on my Instagram here, however below is the quick step by step guide + some tips:

  1. Pour paint out in a dish large enough to fit a sponge
  2. Dip the sponge in paint and wipe off excess paint (You can also get a sheet of paper to dip the sponge in once before the wall to get excess paint off that way)
  3. Dip the sponge on the wall (multiple times before reapplying paint)–the imperfections will look great when some squares are faded and others aren’t
  4. Repeat–Pick the spacing you want between each “stone.” (but alternate like actual brick or tile would look, don’t stack them..see below)

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I’m awful at taking step by step pictures, and if you follow me on Instagram I have a video that will be much more helpful.  However, below are some helpful tips–this really was as simple as it seems!

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Tips:

  • Don’t use too much paint, always wipe off the excess before putting it on the wall.
  • Have a Q-tip and a wet paper towel ready in case anything drips
  • I cut a sponge in half for the ends of the wall, but I didn’t end up using it.  Instead I would eyeball the size by bending the sponge–it may make more sense if you see my video on Instagram here.
  • I didn’t measure, I eyeballed everything.  I LOVE the imperfections and feel like it gives it a more vintage weathered vibe.
  • Lastly, and this may be more personal taste, but I prefer using lighter paint colors when doing this.  I’ve tried this method a few other ways, and have found that darker paint colors don’t look as nice–darker colors also highlight mistakes much more than lighter colors.

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So what do you think?  Not too shabby for a cheap alternative to a real backsplash right?  I hope you try it too!  And send me a DM on Instagram and show me what it looks like!  If you’re interested in another way I’ve used a sponge technique, check out my DIY Sponge Paint Wall. And please, sign up for my email updates below.  I promise I won’t spam you.  We can be best buds.

Love,

Deema

 

 

4 Steps To Creating A Beautiful Gallery Wall

It’s no secret I love a good gallery wall.  In fact in my last apartment, I had so many of them that I probably needed an intervention.  I think they bring so much charm to a space, and there are so many different ways to do one.  Whether its a perfect grid family photo wall, or a floor to ceiling display, a gallery wall can bring so much character to your space.  And for an art lover like me, it’s a great way to showcase all my fun finds.

Now that I’m on my third gallery wall in my current home, I thought I’d outline 4 easy steps to follow when creating one yourself.  And while I love a good grid–I plan to do one of my family photos soon–below is a guide for a free flowing gallery wall–perfect for newbies!

Step 1:  Pick an overall “theme.”

Are you aiming to do a collage of family photos? Art? Mirrors? Clocks? A nice combo wall?  Are you going going for a color scheme?

Step 2: Grab everythaannnnnng.

And by that I mean, grab everything that’s a possibility for the wall and place it all in one space.  This way you can look at it all together and get a “feel” for it.  It may not be up on the wall, but by placing it all on the floor together, you can get an idea if you like what you see, or if you need to shop around for more stuff.

Step 3:  Map it out. 

Once you have all the “things” you want, start arranging them on the floor.  It may not be exact, but thinking it through on the floor is helpful.  The most important?  Pick the middle (or most prominent) piece first, that way you have a nice starting point.  I ALWAYS start from the middle.

**If you have significantly larger pieces along with smaller pieces, see my tips below for that too.

Step 4: Grab your hammer and don’t overcomplicate things.

Grab the piece that will be in the “middle” and hang it up.  Don’t think about it, just do it–remember you already mapped it out the step before this.  Here’s an example below.  I knew the white canvass was going to cover my thermostat, so I hung that up first and then started to go “around” it.

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And kept going….

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and going…

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…and going until I was finished!

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Another way to do it, is to start with the larger pieces and go around those.  So for example, that’s what I did with my most recent gallery wall–I picked the two larger pieces, placed them, and then worked the smaller art around them.

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And I did the same thing with my “mini” gallery wall in my bedroom–a reminder, not all gallery walls need to fill an entire wall. I grabbed the larger piece, and added smaller pieces around it.

 

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Alright, you ready?  And don’t worry if you don’t like something after you hang it up, simply remove it, and rehang it–it’s so easy to patch up nail holes.  I promise you, I’ve done it hundreds of times.  Now go on and start that gallery wall and make me proud.  And send me a DM on Instagram and show me what it looks like! And please, sign up for my email updates below.  I promise I won’t spam you.  We can be best buds.

Love,

Deema

Hate Cords But Love Lamps? Modern Lantern’s Got You Covered.

I don’t know about you, but there are two things that truly frustrate me when it comes to traditional lamps:  First, I hate how ugly cords look.  They drive me crazy, and I will go to great lengths to hide as much of them as I can.  Second, I’m always restricted where I can place lamps because of where my outlets are.  The same goes for beautiful sconces–There are so many places I’d love to have them on my walls, but unfortunately, I don’t have the ability to hard wire all my walls. Well, that’s where Modern Lantern comes in–Their lamps run on a chargeable battery. I recently purchased the Bella Bronze Cordless Lamp, and I couldn’t be more impressed.

Here she is on my fireplace mantel.

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In the middle of my coffee table..

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On my kitchen counter..

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In my living room where I have no outlet…

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My bedroom nook.  See that outlet next to the table?  A normal lamp would’ve had a cord dangling from that table…

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And my dining table…

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I think you get the point.  Now go check them out, I promise you won’t be disappointed.  And check out my Instagram this Saturday, I’ll be sharing a link to their monthly giveaway. And please, sign up for my email updates below.  I promise I won’t spam you.  We can be best buds.

Love,

Deema

DIY Sponge Paint Wall–Small Budget, HUGE Impact

Not a weekend goes by when I’m not painting these days, and I have another super easy (and cheap!) DIY that I just finished this past weekend.  Remember that Faux Wallpaper Dot Wall I did a few months ago?  Well instead of a paintbrush, I used an old dish sponge.  Yup, you read that correctly.  There are all kinds of different sponge techniques that you can play around with, and below is the one I chose to use this weekend.

This is what you’ll need:

  • Paint (I used Blackest by Clare Paint)
  • Painter’s Tape
  • Dish sponge
  • Scissors
  • Paint tray, or small disposable container (I used a small tupperware)
  • scratch paper
  • Drop cloth

(I know this sounds like a lot, but it’s not)

Step 1:

Lay out the drop cloth and place the paint and all the materials on top.

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Step 2:

Pour a small amount of paint into a tray, or in my case, I used a small tupperware that would fit my sponge. **You will not need much paint AT ALL.  My wall was small but I barely used any.  If you choose to do a larger wall, I’m confident you won’t need much either.

Step 3:

Cut the corners of the sponge off just to soften the edges.

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Step 4:

Place the tape on the wall you want to paint.  You can probably measure it, but for me, I eyeball everything.  I always aim for straight-ish around here.

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Step 5:

Dip the sponge into the paint and be sure to use the extra piece of paper to dab all the excess paint–this is SUPER important because if you don’t, the paint will drip and will not be cute.  Trust me, I speak from experience.

Step 6:

Start pressing the sponge on the wall to the left of the tape, and then to the right of the tape in the pattern shown below.  It’s ok (and in my opinion looks better) to have some imperfections in size and color.  You will see that some of mine are super dark, while others are very faded.

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Step 7:

Repeat.  I simply moved the tape over, and over, and over, and over…etc.

Step 8:

Enjoy!  And embrace the imperfections.  What do you think?  Small budget, HUGE impact.

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It looks WAY better in person, and on video.  Be sure to check me out on Instagram if you want the video version of this tutorial.  And please, sign up for my email updates below.  I promise I won’t spam you.  We can be best buds.

Love,

Deema